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Faculty Development

The purpose of Faculty Development at the University of Richmond is to support the flourishing of our exceptional faculty in their roles as committed and engaged teachers, scholars, researchers, and creative artists across the University's five schools. Faculty development programs, services, and resources enhance instructional innovation and support scholarly and creative activities that further the University's mission to "sustain a collaborative learning and research community that supports the personal development of its members and the creation of new knowledge." The Provost’s office is particularly interested in supporting faculty development opportunities which promote inclusive pedagogy and creative and scholarly work at every level of the career cycle.

The opportunities to the left highlight some of the faculty development resources. Contact Sandra Joireman, Associate Provost for Faculty sjoirema@richmond.edu, for additional faculty development resources at the University of Richmond.

Feature Stories

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News Releases

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Faculty Highlights

  • Donald Awarded NSF Grant

    Kelling Donald, associate dean and professor of chemistry, has received more than $375K in grant support from the National Science Foundation for his research on chemical bonding. Read more here.

  • George Flanagin

    George's current areas of research interest are Natural Language Processing in English and Spanish, synthetic text generation, simulations, and data analysis using Python and pandas.

  • Russell Published

    Kristin M. S. Bezio, associate professor of leadership studies, and Anthony Presti Russell, associate professor of English and comparative literature, published their co-edited book "William Shakespeare and 21st-Century Culture, Politics, and Leadership" with Edward Elgar. 

  • Leopold Receives $275k Grant

    Michael Leopold, Floyd D. and Elisabeth S. Gottwald Professor of Chemistry, has been awarded a nearly $275,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to explore the development of a nanoparticle-based sensor used for detecting explosives. Read more

  • Bezio Published

    Kristin M. S. Bezio, associate professor of leadership studies, and Anthony Presti Russell, associate professor of English and comparative literature, published their co-edited book "William Shakespeare and 21st-Century Culture, Politics, and Leadership" with Edward Elgar. 

  • Management professor submits statement to U.S. Committee on Agriculture

    Deniz Besik, assistant professor of management, recently submitted a statement to the U.S. Committee on Agriculture regarding the food supply chain during the COVID-19 pandemic. "Hunger and food insecurity are crucial societal problems that need to be addressed all over the world. Food is essential to our well-being, and we need food to survive. This past year has helped us to identify weaknesses within our food system or food supply chains. COVID-19 crisis elevated the already existing inequalities regarding healthcare and food insecurity status of vulnerable communities, including low-income people, children, older adults, and immigrants living in the United States."

  • Sackley Receives NEH Grant

    Nicole Sackley, associate professor of history and American Studies, has received $6,000 in summer funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities to advance her book project, which explores the history of cooperatives in the United States. Read more: http://bit.ly/Sackley-NEH-Grant

  • Sweis Published

    Rania Kassab Sweis, associate professor of anthropology, published "The Matter of Child Lives: Police Violence and the Limits of Children’s Rights" in the Spring 2021 issue of NEOS.

  • Hass Published

    Jeff Hass, associate professor of sociology, published Wartime Suffering and Survival: The Human Condition under Siege in the Blockage of Leningrad, 1941-1944 through the Oxford University Press.

  • Sevin Received NSF Grant

    Jennifer Sevin, visiting lecturer of biology, received a grant from the National Science Foundation for a project focused on undergraduate research exploring the wildlife trade. Read more here.